COMEDY: Waiting For 2042 – Hari Kondabolu

Hari Kondabolu - Waiting For 2042

It’s almost the weekend and I wanted to leave you, dear readers, with this brand new gem of a comedy album from Hari Kondabolu, a stand-up from Queens, New York. His brand of humor trends #racial #liberal and #progressive, which makes him sound like a bookish snore. Not the case! I’ve been to many of his shows (and many of his brother’s shows) and, while he certainly does appeal to the socially-minded, racially-conscious among us, he does so with an adeptness rare among contemporary popular comics. If Chris Rock circa Bring The Pain was the embodiment of outward comedic rage as a result of marginalization, then Hari is the smoldering inward counterpart. It’s no wonder he was a writer for the brilliant but (unfortunately) now defunct Totally Biased With W. Kamau Bell.

Hari is removed from Seattle by less than a degree of separation — he used to live in the Town and counts Blue Scholars and Macklemore among his friends — so he falls conveniently within 206UP’s purview. In any case, Waiting For 2042 functions as both a comedic insider’s perspective on what it means to be a person of color in America and as a translation for those on the outside (read: white people) who wish to understand what it means. (Those people are rare, but they do exist and I’m trying to collect as many of them as I can.) As it turns out, some of my best friends are actually “you (white) people” and this album is required listening if you hope to keep me around for much longer.

(Out of) Town Movement Comedy

VIDEO: The Untitled Kondabolu Brothers Project (feat. Blue Scholars)

It’s fairly clear from this clip that Sabzi should be the (un)official third host of The Untitled Kondabolu Brothers Project, a semi-regular comedic freestyle session that¬†occasionally¬†features prominent guests (like Blue Scholars, for example).

For the uninitiated: Hari Kondabolu is an up-and-coming (sorry, I hate that term) comedian who has roots and connections in Seattle. Check out his steez, here. His brother, Ashok, is the third member of Das Racist; and if you don’t know who that is, well then why are you even reading this? Get out of here. Now. I’m serious.

(Via Blue Scholars’ tumblr.)

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VIDEO: “Immigrants For Sale”

I don’t post very many PSA-type things on 206UP.COM (many artists the site favors are experts themselves at bringing the proper knowledge), but this animated piece on for-profit detention centers was so well done I couldn’t pass it up.

(Spotted on comedian Hari Kondabolu’s blog.)

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I Miss You, Massline Blog

Massline Media

How many of you out there used to read the Massline Blog? Back when the Massline fam-damily were presumably much-less busy, they kept us Townfolk informed and entertained by posting the latest on artist news, shows, and album releases. They also kept us in stitches from the hilarious photo diaries and funny-because-it’s-not-funny social commentaries that Sabzi and comedian Hari Kondabolu would post. (Not to say Geo doesn’t also have a sense of humor, but it’s unclear if he’s as funny as Sabzi and Hari because his posts were far fewer in number. And Hari is, after all, a comedian, while Geo is a very serious and political-minded rapper.)

It was good stuff. My Lady even had a brief conversation with Sabzi himself last year at the Mercury Lounge in Manhattan’s East Village, just before Blue Scholars headlined their very first show in NYC, where she told him how funny the Massline Blog was and that we both enjoyed reading it. Sabzi told her, “Thank you for the excellent feedback” (<— actual quote from DJ Sabzi). Alas, it appears the Blog is no more.

Tonight I was mindlessly surfing the internet and somehow ended up on Hari Kondabolu’s Myspace page. Much to my delight, Hari has included one of the funniest of the aforementioned posts. (Click on the photo below to read it.) In this adventure, Hari and Blue Scholars journey into Queens (where Hari grew up) in search of the best Masala Dosa and Burfi, and then to locate a bottle of the (apparently) elusive Mazaa Mango Juice, the magical elixir of Hari’s youth.

Enjoy. And RIP Massline Blog.

A Tour of Queens With Blue Scholars

Views From the Peanut Gallery